Harry Hughes
2435

Darran Rees

{"category":"Photography, New York and London","intro":"What excites me about Darran Rees\u2019 imagery is its bare honesty. It hides nothing. It does not try to tell another story than the one created by the coalescence of light and shadow, of stark and dull colour, of expressive and indifferent faces captured in a still more honest moment in time.","intro_2":"As I move from a lady smoking on a purple couch (nominated in the top 100 of the Taylor-Wessing prize at the National Portrait Gallery), her hair slicked back as after a short shower, the sun streaming through West London windows, to the memorialist, post-modern, \u2018post-feeling\u2019 impression of phone cables and lonely trees of \u2018Delta Nightlight\u2019, I am already unsettled by the photographer\u2019s powerful storytelling. Understanding the elements of what makes a picture resonate in the imagination - both internal mood confessed by the photographer, and external forms that envelop gently and faithfully a myriad of human emotions \u2013 his art has in it that meditative, nostalgic quality that makes you want to keep on looking. No wonder then that his work has been used by some of the world\u2019s best known brands, along with commissions by grass-root organisations.\r\n\r\nWe find a basketball court, old and cracked, bordered by post-apocalyptic grass; the day is accidently sunny, transfusing the foreground with shadow, the Mid-American rays glinting off what seems like a spaceship in the background, clouds like hands waving down. You expect a lonely youth to walk into the picture and smile, dreamily yet sadly, for the picture is moving with sound and emotion. From the same series \u2018There America\u2019, two men are sitting in a barber shop, one draped recklessly in a red sheet, already shaved, expectantly waiting for his friend to have his head shaved; they are talking, living the slow yet comfortable Mississippi life. This seems like a humorous anecdote from the mind of Mark Twain. The tessellated floor, a thought experiment that seems inspired by the mathematical art of M. C. Escher, confuses the eye \u2013 is it moving\u2026are the gentleman floating? It is realist, as I said, and yet conceptual; entirely truthful yet somehow surrealist, knocking on a door beyond the conscious mind. What amazes me is that he seeks out these surprising \u2018moments\u2019 and brings them to life with a strong sense of soul and integrity, leaving aside the wishy-washy photography so common in our age. His work has the journalistic eye of wartime photographer Henryk Ross, the playful yet earnest spirit of American contemporary Rodney Smith, and the moody serenity of Thomas Dodd. \r\n\r\nAnd so, it is the metaphysician at work behind the lens that appeals to me. Those black and white, moody landscapes, with ancient churches and army-like tombstones jutting out beneath a heady sky that you could drink from. The \u2018movie star\u2019 truck driver and his companions in the mountains of Rajasthan, framed in a way that defamiliarises the familiar, making us appreciate their hardy, hauling, weather-beaten, unannounced work even more. The Romanian selling honey in a land where the human spirit is tested to its upmost (the fog and snow, together with the man\u2019s stiff figure reminds one of truly affecting war art \u2013 bizarre, yet framed with grit and sincerity).\r\n\r\nNaturalist, conceptualist, realist, part-surrealist? This undefinable essence, like the work of the original French poets, an ephemerality of mood and feeling constantly pressing forward, is what captivates, pulls, stops, and slowly opens our eyes to new worlds and dreams. No picture does this so much as one of those featured here on the site \u2013 \u2018Stop Lights\u2019 from the NYC Highline series. The fog shimmers above the stop lights, and the sun appeals to find a way into the scene, bringing with it hope and refreshment for the inhabitants of an oily district. The lines curve, fall, clasp and meander away, but a sense of peace dances across the windows and onto the lens. A piano plays somewhere, an oboe is heard, a girl is telling her lover she is coming over as soon as she takes a last sip of gin and tonic. And then the lights go amber to green and we keep moving on\u2026\r\n\r\n \r\n","text_col1":"As I move from a lady smoking on a purple couch (nominated in the top 100 of the Taylor-Wessing prize at the National Portrait Gallery), her hair slicked back as after a short shower, the sun streaming through West London windows, to the memorialist, post-modern, \u2018post-feeling\u2019 impression of phone cables and lonely trees of \u2018Delta Nightlight\u2019, I am already unsettled by the photographer\u2019s powerful storytelling. Understanding the elements of what makes a picture resonate in the imagination - both internal mood confessed by the photographer, and external forms that envelop gently and faithfully a myriad of human emotions \u2013 his art has in it that meditative, nostalgic quality that makes you want to keep on looking. \r\n\r\nNo wonder then that his work has been used by some of the world\u2019s best known brands, along with commissions by grass-root organisations. We find a basketball court, old and cracked, bordered by post-apocalyptic grass; the day is accidentally sunny, transfusing the foreground with shadow, the Mid-American rays glinting off what seems like a spaceship in the background, clouds like hands waving down. You expect a lonely youth to walk into the picture and smile, dreamily yet sadly, for the picture is moving with sound and emotion. From the same series \u2018There America\u2019, two men are sitting in a barber ","text_col2":"shop, one draped recklessly in a red sheet, already shaved, expectantly waiting for his friend to have his head shaved; they are talking, living the slow yet comfortable Mississippi life. This seems like a humorous anecdote from the mind of Mark Twain. The tessellated floor, a thought experiment that seems inspired by the mathematical art of M. C. Escher, confuses the eye \u2013 is it moving\u2026are the gentleman floating? It is realist, as I said, and yet conceptual; entirely truthful yet somehow surrealist, knocking on a door beyond the conscious mind. What amazes me is that he seeks out these surprising \u2018moments\u2019 and brings them to life with a strong sense of soul and integrity, leaving aside the wishy-washy photography so common in our age. His work has the journalistic eye of wartime photographer Henryk Ross, the playful yet earnest spirit of American contemporary Rodney Smith, and the moody serenity of Thomas Dodd. And so, it is the metaphysician at work behind the lens that appeals to me. Those black and white, moody landscapes, with ancient churches and army-like tombstones jutting out beneath a heady sky that you could drink from. The \u2018movie star\u2019 truck driver and his companions in the mountains of Rajasthan, framed in a way that defamiliarises the familiar, making us appreciate their hardy, ","text_col3":"hauling, weather-beaten, unannounced work even more. The Romanian selling honey in a land where the human spirit is tested to its upmost (the fog and snow, together with the man\u2019s stiff figure reminds one of truly affecting war art \u2013 bizarre, yet framed with grit and sincerity).\r\nNaturalist, conceptualist, realist, part-surrealist? This undefinable essence, like the work of the original French poets, an ephemerality of mood and feeling constantly pressing forward, is what captivates, pulls, stops, and slowly opens our eyes to new worlds and dreams. No picture does this so much as one of those featured here on the site \u2013 \u2018Stop Lights\u2019 from the NYC Highline series. The fog shimmers above the stop lights, and the sun appeals to find a way into the scene, bringing with it hope and refreshment for the inhabitants of an oily district. The lines curve, fall, clasp and meander away, but a sense of peace dances across the windows and onto the lens. A piano plays somewhere, an oboe is heard, a girl is telling her lover she is coming over as soon as she takes a last sip of gin and tonic. And then the lights go amber to green and we keep moving on\u2026","col1":"

Your work captures me by its candour and truthfulness. How do you go about depicting so much realism and life in each shot?<\/em><\/p>\r\n\r\n

Well, as a product of a working class Welsh Valley I guess there was an element of the real in my background. There is a certain rawness to a non-privileged background that brings a certain passion, and edge. The artist side of me or the female side of me if you like, help to direct this energy and make it coherent. With the act of photographing, I have always looked for connections that would help continue the narrative of the scene or the moment I had felt, or was beginning to form in my eye-mind-heart at that time.
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The truthfulness? I guess i look for it. I Try and get below the surface. Try and imbue it with a essence of simplicity yet power and truth telling. Wether that be one of my \u2019street\u2019 pictures or a big commercial production. For me It\u2019s about getting to the core and pith , the stripping away to reveal the strength - rather than adding layers of \u2018fat\u2019 or \u2018bullshit\u2019 - which there is now so much of in mass market photography. We are bombarded with so much \u2018surface\u2019 stuff right now, which unfortunately in the Millennials generation is at risk of becoming a norm in which to judge all work.<\/p>\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n

Your work is alive with feeling, both expressed through form, light, shadow etc and deeper, more subtle confessions of emotion (your Parisian retrospective \u2013 From my Window - on Saul Leiter\u2019s work is a great example). Do the people in your shots (i.e. the man walking beneath your Paris window with the hat on) profess some of the feelings you experience as an individual, or are you playing voyeur and simply telling their story?<\/em>
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It is very much a combination of the two. Photography is almost literally my voice, my language of communication. (Only child and slightly dyslexic!)<\/p>\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n

Every picture I have ever made has been a statement about what I think about something and what I want to say and or impart at the time. And yes it is all about light and form - in my world these are the only ingredients (or words) I have to tell a story so I\u2019m very attuned to these elements , I recognise them when they reveal themselves and i\u2019m grateful when they do , It kinda feels like some sort of sixth-sense. thus I set about arranging their form in how I think best and hopefully does the subject justice. This can all take place in a nano second on a street or over a long day shooting the latest new car in a landscape. I thought about this question yesterday while out photographing , and I realised I see everything broken down into data streams but my data is like swarms of random musical motifs before my eyes and now and again I manage to arrange them into a decent score.<\/p>\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n

The Paris work was a love letter really. The year I lived there before reluctantly returning to London a few years back, was one of my happiest. I felt intensely absorbed into the uneven texture and fabric of that city . <\/p>\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n

Paris, as described to me by a old Parisian musician, is like a woman who will only reveal herself properly to you if she likes you, otherwise you will only ever see her \u2018surface\u2019 .I had already felt this very thing before he said it to me, I felt at the time she had let me in - I hope so.<\/p>\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n

Do many of your projects, like the NYC Highline series or those shots of the 16th century Bainakeil church (which are beautiful by the way), come from a sense of soul searching, seeking to find \u2018God\u2019 in the great outdoors?<\/em><\/p>\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n

With most of my own personal work it usually reflects where I am in my head at that time- even in the colour of my pictures.<\/p>\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n

So I think I subconsciously react to things that relate to a particular time in my life. For the last few years I have felt in transition into a new phase of life and work. I have photographed in New York many times -both commercially and personally, but it spoke to me and revealed itself to me in such a unique way during that particular day and my reaction to it was almost without control -seeing reality thru my current fog perhaps?. It felt like , as with many pictures, getting lost in playing or composing music- it\u2019s only after you \u2018come back down to earth\u2019 - that you realise you may have made something of worth.<\/p>\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n

I have always felt connected to the earth. There are specific areas of Northern Scotland particularly , that have so much spirit and energy I have very often literally felt a buzz on my neck from standing on or near it. I deliberately try and tap it and allow that energy, wether it is a silent energy or a big dramatic one to flow through me. I have said before, that hopefully I am merely a conduit as a photographer, rather than someone who tries to recreate the essence or soul, later on in his or her digital darkroom - or god forbid in CGI, and there are many out there believe me doing this.<\/p>\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n

So yes I\u2019m attracted to these places of energy and spirit for sure. Its funny you mentioned God , as one of the Bainakeil church pictures as always had the working title of \u2019Stairway to heaven \u2018 <\/p>\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n

One of my favourite images \u2013 suffused with so much poetry and emotion \u2013 is \u2018Stop Lights\u2019, from the NYC Highline project - shot, as you say in your blog, in some \u2018pretty unique light\u2019 (I also notice that it was featured in the Best 200 Ad Photographers W\/W 2016-17). What were you saying here to your audience?<\/em><\/p>\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n

Thank you. It is also one of mine. I love the fact you said \u2018Poetry\u2019. Wasn\u2019t it Arthur miller who said \u2018he was just trying to make a poem from the evidence\u2019 Well, that exactly describes what I try and do. A friend of mine -who happens to be a fine poet, said to me recently, as a compliment, that I had great technique and understood the techniques at my disposal as a photographer and thus create ( good ) images. My immediate and honest reply was that to me it has nothing to do with technique but rather feels more like poetry. My own immediate poems told In my way - visually. The picture you refer to is all about those two red stoplights and the person suspended below it and the sun suspended above. It basically says that you as a viewer can go no further, you cannot enter further but must stop and read and take in this moment, these realities, these essences suspended in fog. From a classical point of view it also has the two triangles of composition which I tend to be subconsciously attracted to. (red lights to person, red lights to sun)<\/p>","col2":"

In your blog you mention that Sasha Wolf of the Manhattan Gallery \u2018Sasha Wolf Gallery\u2019 thought your Romanian series \u2018Romania Lands\u2019 to be among your strongest. I agree \u2013 the word \u2018potent\u2019 comes to mind. What was it like shooting in such a barren wilderness, and what did you go searching to find?<\/em><\/p>\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n

Well full disclosure here, my beautiful little wife is Romanian and we lived in eastern Romania for the year before we moved to Paris -where she studied make-up. At the time I was about to get on a plane and live in Manhattan. Mihaela, my wife, had suggested I live with her in Romania while she finished her university studies there, as a alternative idea to NYC. two very contrasting worlds and choices. I decided to take the more unknown one.So I had the advantage of being one level below the surface already that winter day a few years back when I drove off - alone, in a rental car to drive the 12 hours to Northern Romania and the border of Ukraine. <\/p>\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n

I was and still am trying to show the transition of Romania as it finally rises from the chains of it\u2019s communist and corrupt past and into it\u2019s new future. I am as I have said ,a photographer who loves form and connection in pictures that helps, or tells a story. Well, in this part of Romania and particularly in the weather conditions it endures during it\u2019s winters, (minus 10 - 20 degrees - as it was while I made most of these shots) I was presented with all the right ingredients to say what I wanted to say in the compositions and with the people I came across. A certain simplicity yet strength, A quietness yet power. (metaphors for the very lovely and often misunderstood Romanian peoples I might add)I think Sasha Wolf liked them for those reasons; Simplicity - Strength - Form - Message.<\/p>\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n

Are you seeking beauty in your shots? Or do you think that is an undefinable essence that is completely subjective?<\/em>
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No I\u2019m not seeking beauty. If someone says your work is beautiful I feel happy and take it as a compliment, but I do not set out to actually make things beautiful (unless of course it\u2019s commercial commission where that is the brief!) What I do do I hope, is to show the world in ways that connect and have an effect. So I guess it is subjective. Even in some of the Romania work, which is for most part visually bleak, people comment on their beauty. I also too of course believe there is a \u2018certain\u2019 beauty to them, very much so, but would I call them beautiful? I\u2019m not sure. The dichotomy though, is that when I am suddenly captured by something - say the broken remains of that large orange communist concrete bridge in the snow in Romania, I remember driving past it at speed and glimpsing that scene momentarily , and saying out loud to myself \u201c wow ! that was ******** beautiful \u201c before braking hard and turning around!<\/p>\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n

I find a flicker of surrealism in some of your work, perhaps a method of \u2018fine-tuning\u2019 moments that tell a story beyond the moment itself. Not quite a pun or irrational gesture say, but something that plays on the mind. Would you agree with this?<\/em>
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Oh yes, I totally agree (you're good) I go about this deliberately. I 'am always trying to look for that little sign or symbol or subliminal message that will play on the mind of the viewer and hopefully get that viewer to look a little more closely, question more, feel more, be enlightened more, more unsettled if required. Anything that can help grab the attention, particularly these days when as I have already implied, we are bombarded with pictures. It is not difficult for me to avoid the current trend of thinking your picture first needs to engage the audience as a 68 x 68 pixel \u2018thumbnail\u2018 before they \u2018might\u2019 decide to spend a few more seconds on looking at it properly, and in more detail, but it's not easy! <\/p>\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n

An example is the picture of the Stallion in the sea. (or \u2018Pegasus Noir\u2019 as my poem writer friend titled it). This came about last spring when I thought about a trip to Northern Scotland to make landscapes. The first such trip for a few years. But I wanted to avoid the traditional landscape. I was thinking about this location right at the very top of Scotland that I knew and I suddenly had the picture in my head of a beautiful horse and its rider standing in a still ocean, centred in this unique landscape location and with a mirror-like reflection of themselves in the water. As usual, I made a small drawing of the idea first, and I could see if it would work. I headed off alone to the far north a week later to find and bring the drawing to life. Having found out the tide time table for the location I then set about finding my horse. I was put in touch via the local post office via the local garage via the local hotel owner with a lady who ran a riding school 17 miles away. She - the lovely Lorna , showed me various sweet, but small, pot bellied ponies around her stable that I knew would not work. Finally seeing I was trying desperately not to show my disappointment she said \u201cI do have a black stallion called \u2018Cap\u2019 i keep in a field a few miles away\u201c.<\/p>\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n

I had my horse and rider. Lorna offered to ride Cap to the location as he was too big for her horse box. Scotland and particularly Northern Scotland being what it is even in late spring the weather can be very bad. We had very high winds and rain over the two mornings and one afternoon I thad to get the picture. The waves were lapping over my chest-waders and I had to weigh down the tripod that had a very expensive Nikon fixed to it, and I had to abandon my location flash lights after being blown over despite weights. No mirror reflection for me, which was what I had really wanted . The main concept after all was about the land, preservation and reflection, spirit beauty etc. I remember thinking while trying to direct Lorna and Cap in this mad dance with the elements (poor Lorna was almost hypothermic after 30 mins) that this was simply not happening. However, Cap had never stood in water before and was a little worried about this odd stuff around his legs. So he started \u2018pawing\u2019 at it almost cat-like , with his huge leg and hoof. I instinctively shot around three frames as he did this. The fact this animal has ended up looking even more chess-piece-like due to the unusual shape of his leg kicking the water gave me the opportunity to offer a more symbolic image than I had originally planned. It is simply a strong simple moment in time which hopefully says something and creates a narrative. Yet, at the end of the day, its a just woman on a horse standing in the sea with just me a camera and a tripod and without Photo-shop.<\/p>\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n

How has your upbringing and your life impacted the way you take pictures and the projects\/commissions you take on?<\/em><\/p>\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n

To be a little Freudian about it, I\u2019m pretty sure that as a only child I remember specifically making up my own worlds in my head and imagination ,and, basically have continued doing that into adulthood - as an image maker.
In the very early days - from four years of age onward, I had a talent for drawing and painting and my parents and later my great art teacher at comprehensive school, used that as a way to encourage and help me leave the would be constrains of the valleys as it was back then in the late eighties. I did art and became a mural painter before discovering a old book in a local little Welsh library by the great Don Mccullin . (who I had not heard of at that time) It was the book of his Vietnam photographs called the \u2019Destruction Business\u2019, I went home and never picked up a paintbrush again - It was like a light had been switched on. I realised from then on, the power and message of a still image and how it can say a thousand words if handled correctly and given the respect the medium deserves.<\/p>","col3":"

I recently became member of London\u2019s \u2018Front Line\u2019 journalists club .I discovered a now elderly but active Don Mccullin is also a member and I see him there. They have one of my pictures hanging in the club room next to a portrait someone has made of Don, which makes me feel very proud. As a freelance photographer from the background I describe does not allow me to be too choosy about what jobs I take on. I try and inject whatever it is that makes me different into whatever subject I am offered or choose, and try and treat them all the same. I\u2019m basically a documentary photographer at heart, even with large commercial shoots on large formats , they\u2019re usually shot very wide deliberately to tell the \u2019story\u2019 and have the viewer \u2018in there\u2019, inside the picture , involved experiencing the situation (or scene). Some of the work I am most proud of is for Fair Trade \/ Cafe-direct and Tea-Direct. Money from Commercial work afforded me to travel to many remote regions of the world for these charitable organisations over a few years, photographing the growers, artisans and communities that risk their lives and live in poverty mostly, in order to grow products that we take for granted and drink at great cost back in the developed world. Hopefully the work I was involved in helped sell these great products which contributed financially directly back to the growers themselves - unlike other large commercial companies that I won\u2019t mention.
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One of your projects, \u2018One Year in Two Rooms \u2013 A Conversation with Myself\u2019 (found on your website), features some powerful imagery with a grittiness and humility that I find inspiring, particularly because you are finding worth in everyday moods and objects. What would you say to some of those photographers that say it\u2019s only the unexpected which enthrals and delights the eyes?<\/em><\/p>\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n

Thank you, I\u2019m glad you appreciated that project. It was indeed to prove a point, there is a certain beauty in the everyday, the supposedly mundane and in ones immediate environment. I did not chase the work, but rather would see something unveil itself to me in a moment of exquisite light , or in a odd juxtaposition or a funny assembly of things seen unexpectedly, or a \u2018landscape\u2018 in the lounge! and grab the compact.<\/p>\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n

I have a wide knowledge of photography, photographers and its history, so I have always been fully appreciative of the work of say William Eggleston and Martin Parr to name but two great exponents of photographing the everyday stuff we think we are all familiar with, until that is, we see it portrayed in a different way. Yes, I would urge any one out there who feel they need to go buy a large format \u00a3 40k 100 mpx camera and take it to Mongolia, to think again and go walk their own neighbourhood first with what ever they have, and look again.<\/p>\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n

What makes you laugh, and what makes you cry?<\/em><\/p>\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n

Honestly, even the nature in my local park in London, makes me shake my head and laugh in disbelief sometimes. But, I am in love with this planet and it\u2019s profound beauty and texture and wildlife and certain peoples. And how the light and shadow illuminates it all and falls upon it all in this ever changing and naturally evolving way constantly amazes and empowers me. To be a witness to this on the many occasions I have been fortunate to do so, has made me laugh spontaneously out loud at the sheer beauty and wonderment of it all. This world to me, is an amazing place. So I find it a challenge sometimes living in the age we live in now. The rape and pillage of our vulnerable places and peoples, our, \u2018all for himself or herself\u2019 mentality, the wonton greed I witness on a daily basis, the lust for power and our carelessness over dependence on non renewables. Not to mention the new addiction peoples have in witnessing the world and each other via hand held devices, heads lowered in ignorance, faces softly illuminated by a dying battery light, rather than actually with each other or with the world itself. Suffice to say, all this does on occasion, bring me to tears.<\/p>\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n

If someone were to take your picture, who would you want to compose and take it? What would the scene look like in your imagination?<\/em><\/p>\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n

Well as I have always felt a bit of a outsider and cosseted in my own world, it would have to be Diane Arbus. I loved her pictures from the first time I saw them. Hopefully she would portray this man perhaps with his camera, by then old and grey and probably living in a caravan , in a way that would convey his passion but at the same time capture the certain madness needed to have given ones life to it.<\/p>\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n

Finally, what is your own favourite photo composition and why?<\/em><\/p>\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n

It's the Black & white of the kids standing on the boulders in North Western Tanzania. After a long, very tiring, bumpy, and off-road drive visiting and photographing in many villages during a fair-trade shoot, our local fixer asked us to please visit one last village - his village, to meet the elders. It was getting dark, and mainly out of courtesy, we said \u201c sure \u201c.<\/p>\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n

As the land rover climbed a hill before dropping down to the village below, I was confronted with this scene. I love this picture because it said so much that moment I saw it , and, well I personally anyway, feel I was successful in conveying what it said in those few moments in the dying light. It conveys hope and danger together. The hope for Africa\u2019s future, the kids future, and the fragility of the wider world.<\/p>\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n

The smoke represents danger and that fragility and is a warning. A warning against the chaos and danger that lay ahead if we and they don\u2019t play our role in protecting and nurturing that future.<\/p>\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n


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